Saturday, December 31, 2011

Middle Township Justice of the Peace election (1845)

from Hendricks County election records (copies available at Plainfield Public Library):

We the undersigned, Inspector and Judges of an Election held in Pittsborough, Middle Township, Hendricks County Indiana on Monday the 7th day of April 1845 do certify that William Mcbee and William A. Long were duly elected Constables in and for said Township for the ensuing year, and for the office of Justice of the Peace Boaz W. Williams had twelve (12) votes, and Alexander Pollick had forty (40).

Witness our hands and seals this 7th day of April 1845.

William Crabb (Seal) Inspector
David Roy (Seal) Judge
Thomas J. Weaver (Seal) Judge

Note: The above return made to the Clerk of the Circuit Court

Friday, December 30, 2011

Guilford Township Justice of the Peace election (1845)

from Hendricks County election records (copies available at Plainfield Public Library):

We the undersigned, Inspector and Judges of an Election held in Plainfield in Guilford Township Hendricks County Indiana on Monday the 7th day of April 1845 do certify that Eli McCaslin received sixty two votes and John C. Johnson received sixty (60) votes [and] were duly elected Constable in and for said Township for the ensuing year, and for the office of Justice of the Peace John Reagan received sixty three (63) votes John Lorrain received one vote and were duly elected.

Witness our hands and seals this 7th day of April 1845.

John Lorrain (Seal) Inspector
Zim Chandler (Seal) Judge
William Walton (Seal) Judge

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Clay Township Justice of the Peace Election (1845)

from Hendricks County election records (copies available at Plainfield Public Library):

We the undersigned, Inspector and Judges of an Election held in Springfield in Clay Township Hendricks County Indiana on Monday the 7th of April 1845 – Do certify that William Moore and Alfred Hunt were duly elected Constables, in and for said Township, and for the office of the Justice of Peace Robert Harvey received forty three votes, Thomas Parker received thirty nine votes and Asael Mann received seven votes.

Witness our hands and seals this the 7th day of April 1845.

Francis Hutchings (Seal) Inspector
James Kersey (Seal) Judge
Henry D. Goolman (Seal) Judge

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Brown Township Justice of the Peace election (1845)

from Hendricks County election records (copies available at Plainfield Public Library):

We the undersigned Inspector and Judges of an Election held in Brownsburg in Brown Township Hendricks County Indiana Monday the 7th day of April 1845, do certify that John Bristow, Noah Harding and Thomas Newham were duly elected Constable in and for said Township for the ensuing year, and for the office of Justice of the Peace William Worrel received seventy three votes (73) and Samuel Betts received two (2) votes.

Witness our hands and seals this 7th day of April 1845
Whitson Nelson (seal) Inspector
Thomas Hollett (seal) Judge
James H. Templin (seal) Judge

Attest:
R.C. Moore
E.S. Watson

Monday, December 26, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 49 (19 June 1987 - 11 July 1988) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1988, as well as 1824-1848.

Monday, December 19, 2011

Teachers Database Updated

Entries from the 1928 school year have been added to the database Index to Teachers in Hendricks County Schools, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a list of all of the teachers in the county's schools, as published in area newspapers at the beginning of each school year by the county's schools superintendent. The list was comprised of the teacher's name and their location, and sometimes included the subjects they were teaching.

The database is in progress - it currently covers 1928-1963.

Monday, December 12, 2011

Clayton High School Databases Added

Listings of students and teachers of Clayton High School for 1921 have been added to the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The lists were compiled from the school's 1921 yearbook, Claytonian.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Hendricks County Elected Officials 1902

from: Biennial Report of Union B. Hunt, Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, For the Two Years Ending October 31, 1902 (Indianapolis: William B. Burford, 1902):

Hendricks County elected officials in office as of October 31, 1902:
--Circuit Court Judge: Thomas J. Cofer (term expires November 17, 1906)
--County Assessor: James D. Pratt (term expires January 1, 1905)
--County Auditor: Charles M. Caviness (term expires January 1, 1904)
--County Clerk: Zimri F. Dougan (term expires January 1, 1905)
--County Coroner: Henry S. Curtis (term expires January 1, 1903)
--County Prosecuting Attorney: Everett Cooper (term expires November 17, 1902)
--County Recorder: William L. Wilson (term expires January 1, 1903)
--County Sheriff: Archibald A. Figg (term expires January 1, 1903)
--County Surveyor: William F. Franklin (term expires January 1, 1903)
--County Treasurer: Oscar Hadley (term expires January 1, 1904)

Hendricks County officials elected in November 1902:
--County Auditor: David D. Mills (term expires January 1, 1908)
--County Clerk: John C. Taylor (term expires January 1, 1909)
--County Coroner: Henry S. Curtis (term expires January 1, 1905)
--County Recorder: Ellis M. Weaver (term expires January 1, 1907)
--County Sheriff: Archibald A. Figg (term expires January 1, 1905)
--County Surveyor: William F. Franklin (term expires January 1, 1905)
--County Treasurer: John E. Vestal (term expires January 1, 1906)

Monday, December 5, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 48 (28 June 1986 - 4 July 1987) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1987, as well as 1824-1848.

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Probate Records Transactions - January 1889

Volunteers with the Indiana Genealogical Society's records preservation project for Hendricks County probate records found a document listing transactions that had been recorded in the probate court in January 1889, while the court was on vacation from its September term. The transactions were as follows:

Letters of Administration issued to the following estates:
--Curtis King, deceased – William R. McClelland, administrator
--Marshall Robards, deceased – Mary Robards, administrator

Wills Probated and Letters Testamentary issued as follows:
--Last Will and Testament of Margaret Reeve, deceased – Mordeci Carter, executor

Letters of Guardianship issued to the following persons:
--Frederick Neiger, upon the persons and estates of Etta May Stutsman and John F. Stutsman, minor heirs of John Stutsman, deceased
--Oliver P. Phillips, upon the person and estate of Estella M. Phillips, a minor
--George P. Sherrard, upon the persons and estates of Alonzo, Izzie, Millie and Thomas Armstrong, minor heirs of Eppa H. Armstrong, deceased
--Marion Bailey, upon the person and estate of Lial Leak, minor heir of Ethan A. Leak, deceased

Submitted 7th day of January 1889 by Enoch G. Hogate, Clerk

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Probate Court Docket - 1880's

Volunteers with the Indiana Genealogical Society's Records Preservation Project for Hendricks County probate records found a document listing the docket of cases to be heard in the Hendricks County probate court. The exact date of the docket is unknown - it is sometime in the 1880's. These were the cases on the docket:

Jonathan H. Johnson vs. Estate of Thomas S. Bray, deceased

Joseph Firkins vs. Estate of Ezekiel Clark, deceased (Hadley & Parker, attorneys)

James M. McClain vs. Estate of Elizabeth A. Clark, deceased (Hadley & Parker, attorneys)

Dorman & Dillon vs. Estate of Elizabeth A. Clark, deceased (Hadley & Parker, attorneys)

George W. Wells vs. Estate of Elizabeth A. Clark, deceased (Hadley & Parker, attorneys)

David M. Watts vs. Estate of Elizabeth A. Clark, deceased (Hadley & Parker, attorneys)

James M. Wills vs. Estate of Elizabeth A. Clark, deceased (Hadley & Parker, attorneys)

Henry Hoak (et al) vs. Estate of Elizabeth A. Clark, deceased (Hadley & Parker, attorneys)

Monday, November 28, 2011

College Students Database Updated

Entries from the 1962 school year have been added to the database Hendricks County Students Attending Indiana Colleges, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a listing of some of the students from Hendricks County who were either attending or graduating from various colleges in Indiana, as compiled from information sent by college officials to area newspapers. The list was comprised of the student's name and hometown, and sometimes included their major or the degree they were receiving.

The colleges that submitted information to the newspapers varied from year to year. Ball State University, Butler University, DePauw University, Earlham College, Indiana State University, Indiana University and Purdue University are among those who submitted information at one time or another.

The database is an ongoing project. It currently covers the period of 1925-1962.

Sunday, November 27, 2011

Probate Records Transactions - September 1888

Volunteers with the Indiana Genealogical Society's records preservation project for Hendricks County probate records found a document listing transactions that had been recorded in the probate court in September 1888, while the court was on vacation from its June term. The transactions were as follows:

Letters of Administration issued to the following estates:
--Mary Carter, deceased; John W. Keeney, administrator
--Sarah Bell, deceased; Thad S. Adams, administrator
--Ira Carter, deceased; Asael H. Carter, administrator
--Jesse C. Hodson, deceased; Ruth Hodson, administrator
--Allie B. Sandusky, deceased; Thad S. Adams, administrator
--Mary Marshall, deceased; William R. McClelland, administrator

Wills Probated and Letters Testamentary issued as follows:
--Last will and testament of James Padgett, deceased
--Last will and testament of Julia A. Lawson, deceased
--Last will and testament of Malachi Haley, deceased; Michael J. Power, administrator with will annexed
--Last will and testament of Robert R. Downard, deceased; George T. Pattison, administrator with will annexed
--Last will and testament of Ralph Barton, deceased; Angalina Barton, administrator
--Last will and testament of Alfred H. Richardson, deceased; George W. Millhon, executor

Letters of Guardianship issued to the following persons:
--James M. Emmons, guardian of Cora Bateman, Theodore Bateman, Nelly Bateman and James H. Bateman, minor heirs Noah Bateman, deceased
--Patrick Walsh, guardian of William Walsh, minor heir of Thomas Casserly, deceased
--William R. McClelland, guardian of James C. Hamrick, an habitual intoxicant
--Bridget Corkern, guardian of Timothy Corkern, a minor
--George W. Millhon, guardian of D. Voorhees Richardson, Frank E. Richardson, Earl H. Richardson and Von E. Richardson, minor heirs of Alfred H. Richardson, deceased
--George W. Millhon, guardian of William B. Craven, minor heir of Alfred H. Richardson, deceased

Submitted 24th day of September, 1888 by Enoch G. Hogate, Clerk

Monday, November 21, 2011

Amo High School 1909 Seniors Database Added

A listing of students of Amo High School for 1909 (senior class only) has been added to the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The list was compiled from the school's 1909 yearbook, The Blue and White.

Monday, November 14, 2011

Teachers Database Updated

Entries from the 1929 school year have been added to the database Index to Teachers in Hendricks County Schools, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a list of all of the teachers in the county's schools, as published in area newspapers at the beginning of each school year by the county's schools superintendent. The list was comprised of the teacher's name and their location, and sometimes included the subjects they were teaching.

The database is in progress - it currently covers 1929-1963.

Monday, November 7, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 47 (27 July 1985 - 28 June 1986) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1986, as well as 1824-1848.

Monday, October 31, 2011

Clayton High School Alumni Database Added

A listing of alumni of Clayton High School for 1899-1920 has been added to the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The list was compiled from the school's 1921 yearbook, Claytonian.

Monday, October 24, 2011

College Students Database Updated

Entries from the 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928 and 1929 school years have been added to the database Hendricks County Students Attending Indiana Colleges, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a listing of some of the students from Hendricks County who were either attending or graduating from various colleges in Indiana, as compiled from information sent by college officials to area newspapers. The list was comprised of the student's name and hometown, and sometimes included their major or the degree they were receiving.

The colleges that submitted information to the newspapers varied from year to year. Ball State University, Butler University, DePauw University, Earlham College, Indiana State University, Indiana University and Purdue University are among those who submitted information at one time or another.

The database is an ongoing project. It currently covers the period of 1925-1961.

Monday, October 17, 2011

Stilesville High School Alumni Database Added

A listing of alumni of Stilesville High School for 1913-1920 has been added to the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The list was compiled from the school's 1921 yearbook, Memories.

Monday, October 10, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 46 (11 August 1984 - 29 June 1985) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1985, as well as 1824-1848.

Monday, October 3, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 45 (27 August 1983 - 4 August 1984) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1984, as well as 1824-1848.

Monday, September 26, 2011

Teachers Database Updated

Entries from the 1930-1939 school years have been added to the database Index to Teachers in Hendricks County Schools, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a list of all of the teachers in the county's schools, as published in area newspapers at the beginning of each school year by the county's schools superintendent. The list was comprised of the teacher's name and their location, and sometimes included the subjects they were teaching.

The database is in progress - it currently covers 1930-1963.

Monday, September 19, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 44 (18 September 1982 - 21 August 1983) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1983, as well as 1824-1848.

Saturday, September 17, 2011

Probate Records Work Session in Plainfield

The Indiana Genealogical Society is holding a work session on Saturday, October 15 from 9:30 am to 4 pm for all those who would like to help with their project to preserve and digitize Hendricks County's earliest probate records. The work session will be held at the Plainfield Public Library and you can stop by at any time during the day to help unfold the papers and place them in folders.

Please register for this work session - you may register online through the library's Events Calendar or by calling the library's Indiana Room - (317) 838-3800.

Since this project was started in 2009, over 2,000 probate records have been worked on.

Monday, September 12, 2011

College Students Database Updated

Entries from the 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934 and 1935 school years have been added to the database Hendricks County Students Attending Indiana Colleges, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a listing of some of the students from Hendricks County who were either attending or graduating from various colleges in Indiana, as compiled from information sent by college officials to area newspapers. The list was comprised of the student's name, hometown and class, and sometimes included their major or the degree they were receiving.

The colleges that submitted information to the newspapers varied from year to year. Ball State University, Butler University, DePauw University, Earlham College, Indiana State University, Indiana University and Purdue University are among those who submitted information at one time or another.

The database is an ongoing project. It currently covers the period of 1930-1961.

Monday, September 5, 2011

Index to Divorce Cases Added

A database consisting of divorce case filings listed in Hendricks County Entry Docket Book 11 (which covers June 1953 to March 1965) and Book 12 (which covers March 1965 to August 1975) have been added to the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The database includes the names of the two parties, the date the divorce case was filed, and the case number.

Monday, August 29, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 43 (24 October 1981 - 18 September 1982) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1982, as well as 1824-1848.

Monday, August 22, 2011

Surname Index to Probate Order Books Updated

Entries from the surname index included at the front of Hendricks County Probate Order Book Volume 4 (15 May 1865 - 30 May 1868) have been added to the database Surname Index to Hendricks County Probate Order Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The surname index was compiled by the clerk at the time they were writing the entries. It includes the subject of the probate case, the type of case (estate, guardianship, etc.), and the corresponding book and page number.

This is an ongoing project - currently the surname index covers the years 1865-1891.

Sunday, August 21, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Students Attending College (1919)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 11, 1919 – page 1, column 4:

YOUNG PEOPLE HEAR CALL OF HIGHER INSTITUTIONS
Large Number Leaving to Attend College

With the opening of colleges and universities, young people of Danville are preparing for another year at higher institutions of learning.

The number planning to go away to school is unusually large this year.

Mary Agnes Showalter leaves Tuesday. She will continue her work at Butler this year.

Robert Hollowell, Jr. will leave Sunday to attend Indiana University. Bruce and Bratcher DeMarcus will also re-enter Indiana.

The Misses Helen Parker, Jeanette Wilson and Anna Martha Osborn will leave within the week to enter Earlham College at Richmond.

Miss Unity Thomas, Darvin Thomas, Estie Hunt and Donald Hogate leave the last of the week to enter DePauw at Greencastle.

Miss Josephine Hornaday will attend Wisconsin University again this year. She leaves the last of the month.

Miss Mary Edwards, Myrle Vogel, and Glendon Scearce have left for Lafayette to take up their work at Purdue.

James Bridges left Friday for Pittsburgh, Pa., to enter a technical school in that city. Orin Shutts left Monday for Chicago University to enter the School of Mechanical Drawing.

Otis Gulley, Jr. left Wednesday for Lafayette to enter the Civil Engineering department of Purdue University.

Friday, August 19, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Couple Marries in Civil and Quaker Ceremonies (1920)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, August 26, 1920 – page 1, column 5:

MARRIED TWO TIMES AND NEVER SEPARATED
First by Rites of Friends Church, Then by ‘Squire

Roy L. Nelson and Lenia Peacock Nelson have been married twice, both times legally and without any separation intervening. They were married some two weeks ago according to the rites of the Friends. Saturday, they were married according to the civil law, ‘Squire Kennedy officiating.

Saturday afternoon in company with the bride’s father, Galileo Peacock, a well known citizen of Guilford township, they appeared at the clerk’s office. Miss Ethel Clark, the deputy, waited on them when they said they wished a marriage license. All was going well until the question, on the application blank, whether either of the parties had been married before, was reached. And they said they had, were in fact then husband and wife.

This was a new problem for Miss Clark and she called Clerk Woodward who decided he had struck something absolutely new early in his official life. Mr. Peacock explained that the lady is his daughter, that she was married but they had all decided as law-abiding citizens that they wished a civil wedding. Mr. Woodward then issued the license and they asked for a brief ceremony, the less formality the better. So ‘Squire Kennedy was called.


from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 16, 1920 – page 1, column 3:

R.L. NELSON DEFENDS HIS MARRIAGE CEREMONY
I, the undersigned, wish to correct the misleading inferences set forth in these columns of August 26, in the article headed “Married Two Times but Never Separated,” which so inferred that I and Miss Peacock had disrespected the Quaker ceremony or “rites” of the Quaker church which we were said to have accepted some time previous to our engaging the ‘Squire under the civil law for our second marriage or, a more lawful union as the article infers.

Correction – The fact is I deny being married twice or by the civil law at all so far as the marrying goes. I contend that we were married but once and that by the so-called Quaker manner. But the fact is that tho [sic] married after the “Quaker manner” we were not married in or by the Quaker church. Hence further steps were necessary in order to provide the civil law a “record” of our intent and action.

The reason we were not married in the Quaker church was because that I myself am not a registered member with any denomination but since I as a Christian heavily indorse [sic] Quaker principles and especially their simple, informal, Divine manner of uniting man and wife, we, Miss Peacock and myself, married under this self-same method without the church. That is, on August 20, we and her parents arranged for the spending of a part of the day in a nice woods just outside Danville where, after having a few hours in prayer and meditation, Miss Peacock and I, long having known our union God’s will, united in holy matrimony, there beneath the skies, with God as witness Who is the only rightful official to such a matter. After our dinner, we went to Danville, secured a license and “Mr. ‘Squire” and proceeded to satisfy “Caesar, the law” whereupon I made known the fact that were already husband and wife by ordinance of God and hence desired only enough ceremony to make a record of our intentions possible and pleasing in the eyes of the law and all was accomplished very nicely. We were married in the woods by the Lord. The action or contract was recorded thru another action at the court house by the kindness of the clerk and the ‘Squire.

I, myself, deny that the power of either uniting or of separating man and wife lies within the power of man or earthly law. And hence I fully agree with the Quaker principles that such is a matter belonging wholly to God Himself as “Liscensor” and officiating minister. I invite any person who desires to slur the Quaker view and practice on this point to note the almost entire absence of separation among those united in marriage under the Quaker or Friends manner of marriage as against the daily divorces among unions made thru the courts or civil law which are too often by the mere hand of man (I pronounce you man and wife) preceded by a moonlight, prayerless courtship.

R.L. Nelson,
Plainfield, Ind.


Monday, August 15, 2011

Work Session for Probate Records Project in Plainfield

The Indiana Genealogical Society is holding a Saturday work session in October for all those who would like to help with their project to preserve and digitize Hendricks County's earliest probate records. The work session will be held on Saturday, October 15 from 9:30 am to 4 pm at the Plainfield Public Library and you can stop by at any time during the day to help unfold the papers and place them in folders.

Please register for this work session - you may register online through the library's Events Calendar or by calling the library's Indiana Room - (317) 838-3800.

Since this project was started in 2009, almost 2,000 records have been worked on.

8th Grade Graduates List Added To Website

Entries from a 1922 list of the 8th grade graduates of Hendricks County's common schools have been added to the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The list consists of the student's name and the township.

Sunday, August 14, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Stilesville Teachers Egged By Students (1920)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, April 29, 1920 – page 1, column 4:

UNFORTUNATE AFFAIR IN STILESVILLE SCHOOL
Roy Cox, superintendent of the Stilesville schools, with Cleo Casserly, Lloyd McClellan, Howard McClellan, Kathleen Ousler and Mary Warmoth, all pupils in the Stilesville schools, are in Squire Kennedy’s court with various charges against them of rout, assault and battery and assault. The parties against whom the alleged offenses were committed are Josephine Lewis, Marcena Kendall, Katie Coble and Helen Coble, teachers in the Stilesville school. It is alleged that a few nights ago Cox bought two dozen eggs and he induced his pupils, named above, to throw them at the four ladies as they were passing along the street. Some of the eggs took effect and some did not. The story goes, according to Prosecutor Owens, that Stilesville has not had much of a school this winter, that Cox is lax is discipline and there was friction between him and other teachers. It is alleged that Cox told pupils that the orders of other teachers were not to be obeyed. The defendants have their hearing May 16.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville School Teachers Named (1920)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 2, 1920 – page 7, column 4:

CONCERNING SCHOOL YEAR IN DANVILLE CORPORATION
Supt. D.T. Cushman, of the city schools, authorizes the following:

Danville schools will open Monday, Sept. 13 with the following teachers:

High school
--L.C. Winternheimer, principal, science
--Leroy Cook, mathematics, manual training, athletics
--Mattie A. Keeney, English
--Latin and history, to be filled
--Ruth Boyd, domestic science
--Mildred Christie, music

Mattie A. Keeney building
--C.C. Bosstick, principal, arithmetic
--Bertha Watts, English
--Ruth Pattison, geography and history
--Helen Hadley, 5th
--Eula Lawson, 4th
--Mae Comer, 3rd
--2nd, to be supplied
--Edith Peyton, primary

Miss Boyd, of Richmond, a graduate of Earlham, taught last year in the Richmond high school. Miss Christie, of Amo, taught music and art in the Clayton high school the past year.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Resident Marries in Boone County (1920)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, July 8, 1920 – page 1, column 5:

KINDER – GRIFFEN
Russell Kinder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Kinder, slipped away to Lebanon, Saturday, where by previous arrangement he met Miss Edith Griffen, daughter of Attorney Griffen, of Sheridan, and they were married at the parsonage of the Christian church. The groom was an overseas soldier and the romance of the young people began while he was in camp in Indianapolis. He is now employed in Indianapolis but their home for the present will be with the groom’s parents here.

Saturday, August 13, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Students Attending College (1920)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 2, 1920 – page 5, column 3:

COLLEGE LADS AND LASSIES PREPARING FOR YEAR’S WORK
The exodus of Danville young people for colleges throughout the middle west has begun, and from all indications the number going this year will far exceed any other previous year. The greatest number are going to Purdue, Indiana and DePauw.

Otis Gulley, Jr., Mary Edwards and May Masten have already left for Purdue to take up their work. Mildred Harrison, Irene Thompson, Margaret Scearce, Bernice O’Brien and Glendon Scearce will leave for Lafayette the latter part of the week to enter Purdue.

Robert Hollowell, Jr. leaves Wednesday to take up his work at Indiana. Benjamin Harrison will continue his studies at the I.U. medical school. Darwin Thomas, Estie Hunt and Milburn Easley are planning to leave the latter part of next week to enter I.U.

Unity Thomas will return to DePauw this year to complete her college course, and Donald Hogate will also take up work at DePauw. John Harvey and Harold Cook of the D.H.S. 1920 class will enter DePauw as freshmen. Harvey is one of the 100 honor students of the state and will receive a Rector scholarship.

Jeannette Wilson and Ann Martha Osborn will re-enter Earlham College at Richmond the latter part of next week.

Lucile Nichols will leave the last of the month for Ann Arbor to enter Michigan University. Mary Agnes Showalter will resume her studies at Butler College next week. Lorine Brill will return to St. Marys-of-the-Woods for another year, and Maurice Kirk will enter a chiropractic school in Davenport, Ia., the middle of September.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Infant Dies From Burns and Fall (1920)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 9, 1920 – page 1, column 4:

LOVABLE CHILD DIES FROM BURNS AND FALL
Heart-Rendering Accident at Home of Wendell Hadley

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Hadley, living southwest of town, died Monday evening from the effects of burns and falling from a high chair that morning.

The child was only thirteen months old. He was seated in a high chair near a stove where the mother was making jelly. In some manner the child rocked the chair until it toppled over. In falling, the child struck the long handle of the stew-kettle and the boiling contents fell upon the child, badly burning it about the head, face, neck and shoulders.

The parents hurried with it to Dr. Armstrong where the burns were dressed and the child returned home. The burns were not considered necessarily fatal but about 7 in the evening, the little life went out before a physician could be called.

There is some question whether the death was caused by the burns or concussion of the brain caused by the fall. The funeral was Tuesday afternoon. The parents have the sympathy of the entire community.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Former Danville Resident Marries in Detroit (1920)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, June 3, 1920 – page 1, column 4:

MARRIED AT DETROIT
Saturday, at Detroit, occurred the marriage of Miss Bessie F. Tinder and Mr. Percy L. Mott in the presence of a few friends. Immediately after the ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. Mott left to spend their honeymoon with his parents, Rev. and Mrs. Thomas Mott, of Whittmore Lake, Mich. Mr. and Mrs. Mott will live in Detroit where the groom is in business. Mrs. Mott will be remembered as a former Danville girl, a daughter of the late Simon Tinder. Her twin sister, Miss Bernice, was married two years ago to Mr. Arthur Converse, of Indianapolis.



Friday, August 12, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Former Danville Resident Dies in Bloomington (1920)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, October 14, 1920 – page 4, column 2:

FORMER CITIZEN CALLED
Thomas J. Clark, formerly a business man of Danville, died suddenly on his farm, west of Bloomington, Sunday. The body was brought to Danville for burial in the East cemetery yesterday, there being a brief service at the grave conducted by Rev. C.C. Ford. Mr. Clark was a member of the 148th Indiana regiment. He was twice married, his first wife being buried in the East cemetery. Their daughter, Ada, died some months ago in the west. Some years ago Mr. Clark moved to Bloomington where he was elected county treasurer. Saturday he was taken ill with indigestion and his physician ordered him to remain in bed. Sunday while Mrs. Clark was out of the room, he arose from the bed and fell dead. Mr. and Mrs. John Hampton and their daughter, Mrs. Retta Adams were among those who came from Bloomington with the body.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Farmer Eaten By His Hogs (1920)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, February 12, 1920 – page 1, column 6:

HIS UNCONSCIOUS BODY ATTACKED BY HIS HOGS
Mrs. Frank Snodgrass found the unconscious body of her husband in the hot log of their farm near Coatesville, Sunday evening. Hogs had chewed off one hand, part of an arm, an ear and [a] portion of his neck. Mrs. Snodgrass was unable to drive the hogs away and she called help by telephone. Mr. Snodgrass had gone out to feed his hogs and fell from a stroke of paralysis. When removed to the house he regained consciousness to tell of what had befallen him. He soon passed away. Mrs. Snodgrass and a son survive.

Monday, August 8, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 42 (22 November 1980 - 10 October 1981) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1981, as well as 1824-1848.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Avon High School Graduates (1921)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, May 12, 1921 – page 2, columns 5-6:

[AVON]
The high school commencement exercises Thursday evening were well attended and greatly appreciated. The address by Rev. Wayne G. Miller was especially strong and helpful. The entire program was enjoyed by all present. The class: Harold Smith, Norene Franklin, Mary Riggan, Rosalie Worrell, Easter Wear, Mary Wear and Fred Walls.

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Residents Attending College (1921)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 8, 1921 – page 1, column 4:

YOUNG PEOPLE ARE LEAVING FOR COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
With September here, young people of Danville are leaving almost every day to take up school work in colleges and universities. By the end of the week, the exodus will be complete. Indiana, Purdue and DePauw claim most of the students. Mary Edwards, Irene Thompson and Margaret Scearce have left for Lafayette to continue their work at Purdue. Lawrence Franklin, Glendon Scearce, Ben Barnett, Herman Pevler and Karroll Sallust will leave this week to take up work at Purdue. Estie Hunt, Darwin Thomas and Paul Pierson are planning to take up work at Bloomington at Indiana university. Professor Louis Winternheimer will leave to enter graduate work at the university this week. Donald HOgate and Harold Cook have left for DePauw and John Harvey and Kreigh Miles will leave next week for DePauw. Jeannette Wilson and Ann Martha Osborn will return to Earlham to take up their work. Lucile Nichols and Robert Hollowell, Jr., will go to the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and Mary Agnes Showalter left Tuesday to resume her studies at the University of Illinois, at Champaign. Ben Harrison, who graduated from Indiana last year, will continue his study of medicine at the Indianapolis department of I.U. Mabel Crawley will soon leave for Oxford to enter school. Mary Marguerite Dougan leaves October 4, for Washington, D.C., to enter National Park seminary near that city.

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Teacher's Secret Marriage Revealed At Death (1921)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, February 17, 1921 – page 1, column 2:

DEATH OF SCHOOL TEACHER REVEALS THAT SHE WAS WIFE
Mrs. Clifford Handy Known Here As Miss Iris Velma Johnston

Mrs. Clifford Handy or, as she was known in Danville, where she was a teacher in the Mattie A. Keeney building, Miss Iris Velma Johnston, died at the home of her husband’s parents in Indianapolis, Thursday night at 8:30. The cause of death was septicemia with acute myocarditis as a contributing factor. The funeral was Saturday morning from an undertaking parlor in Indianapolis. The body was taken to Kentland for burial. Teachers of the Danville schools attended the services, bearing an appropriate floral offering.

Mrs. Handy was 22 years ten months and eighteen days old. In that brief span of life was encompassed the hope, the ambition, the love of many years.

Her charming personality had deeply impressed those whom she had met since coming to Danville last fall to take a place in the schools. No one suspected that she was married – and indeed it is not known here when she was married. It was noted that she did not mingle in social circles as other young people and that she did not enter fully into the life of the community. On Friday, February 4, she went to Indianapolis to spend the weekend. The first of the week, word came that she was too ill to return to her school work. Thursday night she died.

She would soon have become a mother. And thus the radiance of a bright life went out. She will be kindly remembered in Danville.

Monday, August 1, 2011

College Students Database Updated

Entries from the 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939 and 1940 school years have been added to the database Hendricks County Students Attending Indiana Colleges, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a listing of some of the students from Hendricks County who were either attending or graduating from various colleges in Indiana, as compiled from information sent by college officials to area newspapers. The list was comprised of the student's name, hometown and class, and sometimes included their major or the degree they were receiving.

The colleges that submitted information to the newspapers varied from year to year. Ball State University, Butler University, DePauw University, Earlham College, Indiana State University, Indiana University and Purdue University are among those who submitted information at one time or another.

The database is an ongoing project. It currently covers the period of 1936-1961.

Sunday, July 31, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Former Lizton Resident Marries in Scott County (1921)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, April 7, 1921 – page 5, column 6:

MONROE – GROOVER
Thursday afternoon, March 24, at the Scottsburg Methodist Episcopal parsonage the marriage of Mr. Louise Monroe and Miss Dorothy Groover was solemnized, the Rev. J.H. Allen officiating. The bride is a charming young lady of eighteen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.B. Groover, well known former residents of Union township, now living in Scott county, near Austin. She graduated from the grades in the Lizton school and attended high school at Scottsburg. Their marriage is the culmination of a war romance. Mr. Monroe is 20 years old, and enlisted in the army at the age of sixteen, serving with the 168th regiment, Rainbow Division, during the world war. He was in France, England, Belgium, [and] Luxemburg, having been overseas eighteen months. He was wounded in action, May 18, 1918. He was on the following fronts: Lorraine, Champagne, the Marn [sic] offensive, St. Mihiel and the Argonne Forest. In May, 1919, he came home on a furlough and the romance began. Their engagement was announced in November, 1920. Many friends extend best wishes for a long and happy life.

Saturday, July 30, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Marriage Was Bigamous (1921)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 29, 1921 – page 1, column 6:

BIGAMY INTIMATED
James C.S. Nightingale and Goldie Fay Cummins were married in Danville, April 5. When he secured the license he said he had never been married. Authorities in Cleveland seem to have another opinion and Nightingale is serving a term in the work-house at Cleveland on a charge of child desertion, the child being seven months old. Prosecutor Hume is making arrangements to have the man brought to Danville to answer to the charge of bigamy. When he secured the license, Nightingale said he was a railroad man. His bride gave her residence as on a rural route of Indianapolis and her occupation as a bookkeeper.

Friday, July 29, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Former North Salem Resident Murdered in Oregon (1921)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, December 22, 1921 – page 1, column 6:

FORMER NORTH SALEM MAN FOUND MURDERED IN OREGON
Everett E. Davis, born at North Salem, was murdered in his cabin on his claim seven miles from Matalla, Ore. Robbery is believed to have been the motive for the crime, which was committed in November, but discovered only a few days ago. The coroner’s inquest showed t hat Mr. Davis had been struck from behind with an ax. He is survived by his father, Granville Davis, and several brothers living in Indianapolis. He was 37 years old, a graduate of Wabash college, then in the Federal forestry service and teacher in Montana. He resigned his school duties to enter the army and was overseas. Returning to America, he became a traveling salesman, but the condition of his health was such that he had to give up this employment. Then he entered the claim which was the scene of his death. The body is to be brought to North Salem for burial.

Thursday, July 28, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Former Danville Resident Dies in Texas (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, November 30, 1922 – page 3, column 4:

OBITUARY
Harriet Armstrong, whose body was recently brought to this county from San Antonio, Tex., was born in Somerset, Ky., July 29, 1836. She came to Indiana with her parents when but a child and Nov. 2, 1854, she and Levi Armstrong were married. Five children were born to them, Mary Armstrong Bailey, Samantha Eva Armstrong, John S., Thomas A. and William A., the latter surviving. With him Mrs. Armstrong had made her home for thirteen years.

Until she went to Texas in 1909, Mrs. Armstrong had spent practically all her life in New Winchester and Danville. She was a member of the Christian church here and of the South Side Christian church in San Antonio. She was an invalid for many years and suffered greatly at times. Yet when the end came, she went away peacefully, aged 86 years, three months and five days. Her remains were accompanied to Indiana by her granddaughter, Mrs. Eva Bailey Hughes. Another granddaughter is Mrs. Rose Bailey Lewis, of Amboy, Ind., and a great grandson is Allen Bailey Lewis, of Amboy. Mrs. Armstrong was the last member of her father’s family. She was the widow of a civil war veteran and a beautiful silk flag was placed on her casket by Danville Auxiliary, Sons of Veterans.

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Avon/Washington Township Schools Information (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, August 24, 1922 – page 3, column 3:

AVON SCHOOLS
F.M. Sageser, principal of the Avon schools, has announced his teaching force for the coming year: school opens Sept. 11. Those on the high school faculty are George K. Jackson, science and manual training; Beulah Owens, foreign languages and mathematics; Mary Edwards, household art and English.

The grade teachers are Leslie Boicourt, seventh and eighth grades; Madge Herringlake, fifth and sixth grades; Mary Pritchett, third and fourth grades, and Beula Jones, first and second grades. The new teachers include Mr. Boicourt, of Monon; Mr. Jackson, of Jamestown, and Miss Mary Edwards, of Danville.

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 21, 1922 – page 7, column 4:

SCHOOLS OF WASHINGTON ARE STARTING VERY NICELY
Schools of Washington township started in a very satisfactory manner with one one-room school, one two-room school and the Avon schools.

Shiloh is the one-room school with Miss Ruby Bradford teaching 25 pupils. Six Points has two rooms, with Miss Geraldine Jones and John F. Everett the teachers. The enrollment for the first week was 67.

Avon has more pupils than last year. The high school has an enrollment of 55 and the grades 132. The high school is steadily growing and in a few years should be able to take care of all the boys and girls in the township.

Mr. Cox, trustee, has employed a splendid faculty. There are four new teachers. Mr. Jackson, who taught in the Jamestown schools for four years, has physics, botany, physical geography and manual training. He has had two years’ work at the State Normal and is a graduate of Central Normal college. He comes very highly recommended.

Miss Mary Edwards, of Danville, who has charge of domestic science and English, is a graduate of Purdue. She comes direct from the university and is entering upon her work as if she were an experienced teacher.

Leslie Boicourt, the new teacher for the seventh and eighth grades, comes from Monon, where he taught successfully last year. He is the basketball coach and has been long interested in athletics.

Miss Mildred Christie, of Danville, is the music supervisor in the high school. She taught music and art most successfully in Danville last year.

It is hoped that each parent will feel the necessity of perfect co-operation and that every effort will be made to have the children in school promptly each day.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Brown Township Resident Dies in Clark County (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 28, 1922 – page 8, column 3:

OBITUARY
The body of Mrs. Rosanna Hendricks Case was laid to rest, Tuesday, in the Arbuckle cemetery in Brown township. She died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Petty, in Clark county, Friday. She was born near Belleville, Feb. 8, 1844. She was left an orphan at the age of 12 and made her home with her brother and sister until April 7, 1861, when she and Peter Case were married. He died Dec. 31, 1912. To them were born nine children, five of whom have died. The surviving children are Murattie, of White county; Lo M., of Clark county; Mrs. Lora Martha Petty, of Clark county, and Mrs. Ruth Sparks, of Pittsboro. She united with the Bethesda Baptist church when a girl and lived a consistent Christian. She had been an invalid for eight years and had been cared for by her children. She was a kind and loving wife and mother and a good and obliging neighbor. She was a sister of the late Milton Hendricks, of Danville.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Former Hendricks County Resident Dies in Henry County (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, August 31, 1922 – page 4, column 3:

DEATH OF SIMEON MORGASON
Simeon Morgason, several years ago a well-known farmer and stock raiser in this county, died at his home in Knightstown, Friday afternoon, from hardening of the arteries and complications. He was a Kentuckian by birth, but spent the greater part of his life in Indiana. He was in his eighty-second year, and leaves, beside the widow, who was Miss Nannie Stuart, a sister of Thomas Stuart, of this place, two grown sons, Thad, of Knightstown, and Walter, of Noblesville, and three grandchildren.

The funeral was Sunday afternoon from the late home of the deceased, with burial in the Knightstown cemetery. The funeral was largely attended by relatives, neighbors and friends, among whom were W.T. Stuart and daughter, Miss Leona; Mrs. Ann Miles and the Misses Elizabeth Anderson and Ella Arnold, of this place.

Monday, July 25, 2011

Surname Index to Probate Order Books Updated

Entries from the surname index included at the front of Hendricks County Probate Order Book Volume 15 (6 January 1890 - 28 March 1891) have been added to the database Surname Index to Hendricks County Probate Order Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The surname index was compiled by the clerk at the time they were writing the entries. It includes the subject of the probate case, the type of case (estate, guardianship, etc.), and the corresponding book and page number.

This is an ongoing project - currently the surname index covers the years 1868-1891.

Sunday, July 24, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Former Danville Resident Dies in Detroit (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, August 31, 1922 – page 4, column 3:

FORMER DANVILLE RESIDENT DIES AT HOME IN DETROIT
Fred Bonswer, age 41, who came here 15 years ago from Detroit as foreman of the construction crew building the traction line, died at his home in Detroit last week after a long illness. After the completion of the Danville traction, Bonswer continued to make his home here and was a rural route carrier from the Danville office under Postmaster Charles P. Hornaday. He was married to Miss Florence Curtis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Curtis, but his wife died a few months after their marriage. After a residence of several years here, Bonswer went to Detroit, where he married an old schoolmate, and they returned to Danville to live. Two years later they moved to Detroit, Mr. Bonswer having accepted a position with the Street Railway Company, where he since had been employed.

Saturday, July 23, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville High School Graduates Attending College (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, August 24, 1922 – page 8, column 4:

YOUNG PEOPLE HEAR CALL OF HIGHER INSTITUTIONS
Exodus From Danville Starts Soon For Many Points

With vacation nearing a close, Danville’s young people will soon start an exodus for colleges and schools which carries them to many distant points as students and teachers. Most of those going will leave during the first and second weeks of September. Paul Pierson, Darwin Thomas and Estie Hunt will resume their work at Indiana university. Ben Barnett and Lawrence Franklin again will take up work at Purdue. Lorine Brill, Harold Cook and John Harvey will return to DePauw, and Homer Clark enters that institution as a Rector scholar.

James Francis, Claude Walls and Robert Armstrong, all graduates last May from Danville high school, will enter Wabash college. Miss Mary Agnes Showalter has a scholarship in romance languages, and will study in the East this fall. Charles Newman and Frank Christie will enter Indiana Dental college at Indianapolis. Robert Hollowell, Jr. will leave to complete his law course at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and Robert Pickard will enter as a freshman in the school of journalism. Ben Harrison will be an advanced student in medicine at the Indiana Medical college at Indianapolis. Miss Anne Martha Osborne will complete her work at Earlham college. Miss Mary Marguerite Dougan leaves the first of October to resume her work at National Park Seminary, Washington, D.C.

Others are planning to teach this fall, and leave soon for their schools. Miss Mary Edwards will teach at Avon, and Miss Jeanette Wilson at Lizton. Richard Prentice will teach at Batesville. Miss Kate DePew will be in the East Chicago schools this fall, and Miss Dorothy Hamrick will return as a teacher in the Noblesville high school.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Coatesville Resident Killed in Missouri Train Wreck (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, August 10, 1922 – page 1, column 6:

DARIUS MASTEN KILLED IN WRECK IN MISSOURI
Darius Masten, of Coatesville, timber inspector for the Pennsylvania company, was killed in the wreck at Sulphur Springs, Mo., on the Missouri Pacific road, Saturday night.

Mr. Masten was on his way home and was on the local train which was run into by the fast Texas express. The local train was composed of wooden cars. The express was an all-steel train. Mr. Masten was one of the thirty-eight killed.

Word reached Coatesville about 4 o’clock, Sunday morning, that Mr. Masten was one of the victims. His body arrived at Coatesville, Monday evening. The funeral was from his home, Tuesday afternoon, in charge of the Rev. John Cordrey. The Masons officiated at the grave. Interment was in the I.O.O. F. cemetery, Mr. Masten also being a member of that order.

He is survived by Mrs. Masten and two sisters and four brothers, one of the latter being John Masten, trustee of Clay township.

Friday, July 22, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Eel River Township Resident Dies in Los Angeles (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, October 12, 1922 – page 5, column 4:

DIES IN CALIFORNIA
John C. Trotter, a former citizen of Eel River township, died, Sept. 1, at the home of his son, Oliver, in Los Angeles, at the age of 88 years. He moved from this county many years ago to Missouri. In later years he lived in Denver, Colo., and Kansas City, Mo., until three years ago, when he went to Los Angeles. He was a brother of the late W.W. Trotter, James M. Trotter and Elizabeth Emmons, of Eel River township and Katharine Gardner, of Kansas City, Mo., all of whom have preceded him in death.

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Clayton High School Graduates Attending College (1962)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, August 9, 1962 – page 1, column 4:

CLAYTON STUDENTS GO TO COLLEGE
Many students of Clayton High School are enrolled in the universities and colleges listed below for the 1962-63 school year.

Indiana State [University] – Pam Burns, Nancy Phillips, Maurice Wells, James Bryant, Earlden Chowning.

Fort Wayne College – Ronnie Cottongim.

Purdue University – Dennis Bowman, Barbara DeHaven, John DeLong, Bob Dickey, Don Duncan, Tronie Lawrence, Gene Nickels, Steve Thompson.

Olivet College – Jewell Ralph.

Monday, July 18, 2011

Teachers Database Updated

Entries from the 1940-1944 school years have been added to the database Index to Teachers in Hendricks County Schools, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a list of all of the teachers in the county's schools, as published in area newspapers at the beginning of each school year by the county's schools superintendent. The list was comprised of the teacher's name and their location, and sometimes included the subjects they were teaching.

The database is in progress - it currently covers 1940-1963.

Sunday, July 17, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Former County Clerk Dies in Washington State (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, March 30, 1922 – page 1, column 6:

WILLIAM F. HAYNES DIES IN HIS NORTHWESTERN HOME
Once One of Best Known Men in County

William T. Haynes, at one time one of the best known men in Hendricks county, but for many years a citizen of the state of Washington, died last week in his Washington home of pneumonia in his 85th year. He is survived by five children and by Mrs. Haynes, his third wife.

Mr. Haynes was born in Clinton county, Ohio, Oct. 24, 1837, and came to Hendricks county with his parents in 1855. In 1860 he and Harriet A. Cash were married and four children were born to them – Harry, Charles, Agnes (now Mrs. Sissons) and Frank. Mrs. Haynes died April 6, 1875. In 1879, he and Eva Ferguson were married. To them was born one child, William.

In company with William T. Davis, Mr. Haynes built the first roller process mill in Hendricks county, the property which is now known as the Klondike mill. He served four years as clerk of the court. Of generous disposition and pleasing manners, he had a host of friends and is most kindly remembered in the county.

In 1888, in reduced circumstances because of unfortunate investments, he went to the far northwest in the hope of building up his fortune, and he succeeded in a satisfactory degree. He was elected county commissioner and served several terms, and he was then appointed to have charge of the government land office, a position which he held for several years. His second wife died there and he married a third time, his wife being a lady living in Washington.

The death of Mr. Haynes breaks a long list of those who have been clerk of the local court. The line is as follows: William F. Haynes, William R. McClelland, Enoch G. Hogate, David Hadley, Mel C. Masten, Zimri E. Dougan, John C. Taylor, James M. Adams, Charles E. Edwards, A.P.W. Bridges, and the present official, Alvin Woodward.

Saturday, July 16, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Irish Immigrant Denied Right To Vote (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, April 27, 1922 – page 1, column 2:

HE HAS VOTED OFTEN, BUT HE CAN NOT NOW
For over fifty years, Miles Hessian has been an industrious citizen of Middle township, amassing considerable property and rearing a family. For probably as long, he has been a voter. He was born in Ireland, but, having filed his intention of becoming a citizen, he was a voter although he never completed his naturalization. Monday, he appeared at the clerk’s office to take out his final papers and learned that under the new immigration laws he had to start the process of naturalization again. His first papers were of no value. Under the amendment to the constitution of Indiana, lately adopted, he can no longer vote in Indiana until he is a citizen of the United States. Consequently, after voting for half a century, Mr. Hessian will not vote again until he complies with the new laws, and this requires some time.

Friday, July 15, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: World War I Soldier's Body Brought Home (1922)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, March 9, 1922 – page 1, column 2:

SOLDIER’S BODY ARRIVES
Friday, the body of Corporal Burchard McClain arrived from France and was received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fielding McClain, friends, neighbors and former service men, who placed the body in the vault in the [Danville] South Cemetery to remain until arrangements are made for the funeral at Old Union in Boone county. An unauthenticated story is to the effect that Corporal McClain and a detail of five men on scout duty took refuge in a shell hole when being pressed by the Germans and all [were] killed but one who escaped. At any rate, the body of McClain and four other Americans were found in the shell hole, all having been shot to death.

Monday, July 11, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 41 (2 November 1979 - 25 November 1980) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1980, as well as 1824-1848.

Monday, July 4, 2011

College Students Database Updated

Entries from the 1941, 1942 and 1943 school years have been added to the database Hendricks County Students Attending Indiana Colleges, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a listing of some of the students from Hendricks County who were either attending or graduating from various colleges in Indiana, as compiled from information sent by college officials to area newspapers. The list was comprised of the student's name, hometown and class, and sometimes included their major or the degree they were receiving.

The colleges that submitted information to the newspapers varied from year to year. Ball State University, Butler University, DePauw University, Earlham College, Indiana State University, Indiana University and Purdue University are among those who submitted information at one time or another.

The database is an ongoing project. It currently covers the period of 1941-1961.

Thursday, June 30, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: History of Clay Township (1924)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, April 3, 1924 – page 1, column 4:

CLAY TOWNSHIP’S ORIGIN AND NAMING OF AMO
Girl Who Studied Latin Now Aged Woman

(By Our Amo Correspondent)
Clay township was organized as a separate corporation by an act of the board of county commissioners March 3, 1845. It was formed by separating from the north end of Franklin township three tiers of sections of land and three sections from the southeast corner of Marion township, giving an area of about 24 square miles.

The early settlements were made between the years of 1825 and 1831, principally, though the exact identity of the first settlers is not known. Among the families that came prior to 1832 were Obediah, George and John Tincher, Joel and Jesse Hodson, William Benbow, Dr. James Kersey, Newby Hunt, Edward Estes, Abram West, Nicholas Osborne and George Handcock. The poll book of the first election which was held in Springtown, August 3, 1846 gives the names of 101 voters.

Springtown is probably the oldest town in Clay township, and at the time of the completion of the Vandalia railroad in 1852, was a flourishing business village, with stores, a church, shop and nice homes. Abram West had a saw mill there and made a specialty of gray ash flooring so much in use at that time. He furnished ties for two miles of the Vandalia railroad. This road missed Springtown by about one half mile. Joseph Morris owned some of the land and laid out a town plat in 1850 which he called Morristown. This village sprang up quickly and the population was augmented by most of the inhabitants of Springtown moving their houses there. Mr. Morris built him a large house in the west part of town, procuring the lumber from one immense poplar tree which he had sawed into boards. He became the postmaster and soon learned the name of the town must be changed because there was another within the state. Miss Phoebe Lawrence, daughter of Isaac Lawrence, who was then a school girl and studying Latin, suggested the name of Amo which Mr. Morris accepted. She afterward married and is now living in Cincinnati at an advanced age.

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Eel River Township Resident On New Mexico Reservation (1923)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, November 1, 1923 – page 1, column 2:

SON OF HENDRICKS IN INDIAN SERVICE
Carl A. Gossett has been appointed Superintendent of the Jacarilla Apache Indian reservation in New Mexico and took charge on the first day of October. Mr. Gossett was raised in Eel River township and is a son of Thomas A. Gossett, at one time county superintendent of schools in this county. Mr. Gossett attended the Central Normal College for some time and entered the Indian Service a good many years ago as a teacher in the Moqui reservation in Arizona. He was later principal of the Yauktown Boarding school in South Dakota and when that school was abolished he took up clerical work in the agency office. For several years past he has been the chief clerk at the Jacarilla reservation and now steps into the highest place on that reservation as a reward for efficient and long service. The headquarters for this reservation is Dulce, New Mexico. Those who know Mr. Gossett have no doubt of his ability to make good in his new position which is one that requires ability of a high order, as the duties involve business dealings with outside whites, school work on the reservation, welfare work among Indians and unlimited patience and good nature.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Couple Marries in Terre Haute (1924)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, March 6, 1924 – page 5, column 4:

AND THEY ARE MARRIED
Mrs. Ora Trotter, so long connected with Crawley’s restaurant, asked for a few days vacation, Monday week ago, which Mr. Crawley readily granted, saying she could have a week if she wished. About the same time Bert Rowan, of the Gentry garage, was mysteriously missing for a few days. Thursday evening, both reappeared at the Crawley restaurant all togged out in their best. They were the subjects of good natured “kidding” by Mr. Crawley and bystanding friends, but were as silent as the man of the granite hills who now presides over the destinies of this Republic. “Nothing to say,” was their slogan, and they stuck to it for a few days until Mrs. Crawley, in her persuasive way, knowing the nature of “the eternal femine,” wormed the secret from the former Mrs. Trotter, now Mrs. Rowan, when she admitted that she and Bert had slipped away to Terre Haute on Monday of last week, procured a license, and found a minister who spoke the words that made them one. After receiving the congratulations of Mr. and Mrs. Crawley and other friends, Mrs. Rowan made Mr. Crawley happy by informing him that she was not going to quit him – at least, for the present. So, all are happy, and all is well that ends well, as the last picture is thrown on the screen.

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Students Head For Colleges (1924)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 4, 1924 – page 5, column 2:

YOUNG FOLKS LEAVING FOR VARIOUS SCHOOLS
Following is a list of the many Danville young people who will soon leave for college for the winter.

Purdue University: Edgar Franklin, Cecil Merritt, Glen Vogel, Harold Thompson, Margaret Scearce.

University of Wisconsin: Opal Bosstick.

DePauw University: Lodoscia Luchmuller, Chester Comer and Margaret Armstrong.

Indiana University: Orville Crawley, Dorothy Worrell, Hugh Haynes, John Hume, Jr., William Brill and Donald Woodward.

Earlham College: Florence Osborne.

Wabash College: Joseph Gibbs.

Central Business College: Leroy Jones.

John Herron Art Institute: Opal Kivett.

Kemper Military School: John Barrett and Louis Woodward.

Indiana Dental College: Herbert Mason and Charles Newman.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Missing Danville Man Checks In From Wyoming (1923)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, November 29, 1923 – page 1, column 4:

VOICE FROM MISSING ONE
On May 8, 1920, Silas Strange mysteriously disappeared from his home here, without saying a word to anyone as to where he was going and nothing was heard of him until last week, when a letter came to his mother, mailed at Douglas, Wyoming, giving a detailed account of his wandering. He went first to Kansas City and tried to enlist for the World war. Being under 15 years of age they refused to take him. He then traveled through the west, working at odd jobs until he reached Douglas, Wyoming, where he has been employed for some time. Silas was the son of the later John R. Strange, who lived in and around Danville for several years. He was also a pupil at the North Center school.

Monday, June 27, 2011

Amo High School Alumni Database (1901-1916) Added

A list of Amo High School's alumni for 1901 through 1916 has been added to the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The list was compiled from the school's 1916 yearbook, Blue and White.

Sunday, June 26, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Stilesville High School Graduate Marries Teacher (1924)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, May 8, 1924 – page 1, column 5:

STILESVILLE GRADE TEACHER MARRIES H.S. GRADUATE
Miss Ennis Y. Justice, teacher of the third and fourth grades in the Stilesville school, and Allen F. Johnson, a member of this year’s graduating class of the Stilesville high school, were married Saturday, Rev. L.R. Gray officiating, thus marking the culmination of a thrilling romance. Their love affair attracted attention early in the school year. With the adoption of a rule that teachers should not keep company with any pupil, the truth of the statement that the course of true love does not run smoothly was again demonstrated. But it seems that another proverb, that there are exceptions to all rules, came to their assistance. Then the county superintendent found a new call for his office as he was asked to consider the matter. But Father Time proved an aid here as school was almost out. The couple consulted Mr. Reitzel about marriage and Mr. Reitzel diplomatically suggested that he had no objections provided they waited until school closed. This they did and Mr. Reitzel is considering starting a matrimonial bureau as a sub-division of his office.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville High School Student Marries In Illinois (1923)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, November 15, 1923 – page 1, column 3:

MARRIED IN ILLINOIS
With her school books in her hand, Miss Georgeanna Blair left home ostensibly for school, Thursday morning. Before night, she was the bride of Henry Halfacre, of Pittsboro. He met her in Danville and they drove to Marshall, Ill., where they were married. The evening mail brought a special delivery letter to the bride’s mother, Mrs. Anna Blair, stating that by the time she received the letter she would be Mrs. Halfacre. Mr. and Mrs. Halfacre visited in Illinois until Saturday when they returned to his home at Pittsboro. Sunday, they visited in Danville. They will live with his people, Mr. and Mrs. R.T. Halfacre, for the present. He is employed in Indianapolis. Mrs. Halfacre was a member of the sophomore class, Danville high school. Mr. Halfacre graduated from the Pittsboro high school in 1920 and is 20 years of age.

Saturday, June 25, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Couple Marries in Hancock County (1924)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, April 10, 1924 – page 4, column 4:

MARRIED AT GREENFIELD
Miss Helen Ader, and Fred Stewart, prominent Danville young people, were married in Greenfield on Friday, the 28th of March. The fact that they were married did not become known until this week. They have been the closest of friends for some time, and the wedding is not a great surprise to many of their friends. Miss Ader is the daughter of John Ader, and Mr. Stewart the son of Mr. and Mrs. S.R. Stewart. It seems that the couple intended to get the license at Indianapolis, but went to Greenfield to keep it out of the papers for a while. It is probable that they will make their home here.

Friday, June 24, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Township Schools To Become Part of County System (1923)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, February 1, 1923 – page 2, columns 2-3:

[TRANSCRIBER’S NOTE: This is an excerpt from a longer article]

COUNTY UNIT SCHOOL BILL
The proposed County Unit School bill, known as Senate bill No. 87, was introduced in the Senate last week. The bill provides, among other things, that the township school corporation be abandoned and that “the county be declared a municipal corporation for school purposes.” If this bill becomes a law, the township trustees will no longer have charge of the schools, but the management will be vested in five members elected for a term of four years. One of these members is to be chosen from each commissioner’s district and two at large.

These five members, who are to serve without pay, constitute the county board of education and will have entire control of all of the schools in the county, except in towns and cities that maintain their own school corporations. They will choose the county superintendent of schools […]

The present elected trustees, according to the provisions of the bill, will constitute the first county board of education and will serve until Dec. 31, 1926. The section providing that members of the county board of education serve without pay does not apply to the present trustees. They will draw salaries as heretofore allowed, but will not have direct charge of their township schools.

Should this bill become a law, within ten days after it goes into effect the present trustees are to meet and organize themselves into a county board of education and immediately each one is to “turn over and assign to the county board of education all property belonging to his school township, after which the county board of education assumes all debts and financial obligations legalized by law and legally incurred by the trustee of the school township and shall pay the same.” The county treasurer of each county shall be the treasurer of the county board of education and shall collect and keep all money separately and pay the same upon warrant from the county board of education. They shall make the treasurer a reasonable allowance for doing this extra work.

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Plainfield Residents Graduating From Quaker Boarding School (1923)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, May 24, 1923 – page 8, column 6:

SIX GRADUATES
Six of the graduates of the Friends college at Barnesville, Ohio, are from Plainfield. Commencement Day is May 31. The class address is by Mary M. Maxwell and the other graduates from this county are Lindley M. Peacock, M. Evylin Newlin, Edith Helen Newlin, Lena M. Stanley, Theoline O. Allen.

[TRANSCRIBER’S NOTE: Friends College is today known as Olney Friends School – it is a Quaker boarding school.]

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: New Winchester Man Dies in North Dakota (1926)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, January 14, 1926 – page 1, column 4:

JAMES W. WEST DIES IN NORTH DAKOTA HOSPITAL
James W. West, a former well-known citizen of Danville, died last week in Jamestown, N. Dak., of pneumonia, following an operation for the removal of gall stones. He was the son of Xury E. and Sarah A. West, deceased, of New Winchester, and was born May 29, 1858, and was in his 68th year. Deceased is survived by a son and daughter – Earl West, of Indianapolis, and Miss Marie West, of this place, and one brother, Moses C. Weset, of Anderson. At the time of his passing, the deceased had been a nurse in a hospital in North Dakota and had followed that profession for a number of years, having held similar positions in Cincinnati and Indianapolis. Before taking up nursing as a profession, Mr. West had been in business here and in Anderson. He was one of the first men to join Danville K. of P. lodge in early days, and was long active in the order. “Jim” West, as he was familiarly known, had many good qualities. He was big-hearted, of a sociable nature, liked companionship and naturally made friends.

The remains of the deceased arrived in Danville, Monday, and the funeral was held from McClelland’s undertaking parlors, Tuesday afternoon, in charge of Rev. F.H. Longwell of the Methodist church, and the K. of P. lodge. The burial was in the South cemetery. The service was an impressive and appropriate one. The son and daughter and other relatives with friends were present, all bringing their tribute of flowers to the memory of the deceased.

Monday, June 20, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 40 (19 November 1978 - 3 November 1979) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1979, as well as 1824-1848.

Sunday, June 19, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Lake County Couple Marries in Danville (1925)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, October 15, 1925 – page 1, column 1:

“KIDNAPPED” AT GARY AND MARRIED IN DANVILLE
When Miss Mary Conapoetis, pretty Greek girl at Gary, was returning home from the picture show, Monday evening with her mother, an automobile containing three men dashed up to the walk. Mary was seized, thrust into the car which disappeared at terrific speed. The story was spread that there had been a mysterious kidnapping.

When Mary next appeared she was in company with Frank Fetsis, also a Greek, in the clerk’s office in Danville. Frank and Mary applied for a marriage license and Mary’s application said she lived at Brownsburg. They were married by Rev. F.H. Longwell. There was no kidnapping, just a scheme to be married, perhaps the Grecian way.

Saturday, June 18, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Woman Marries Her Grandfather's Friend (1925)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, December 3, 1925 – page 1, column 4:

LADY FROM PITTSBORO MARRIES GRANDFATHER’S PAL
Miss Jennie Helen Ashby, daughter of John Ashby, of Pittsboro, and Silas Hewett, of Pee Wee Valley, Ky., were married at the former home of the bride in Kentucky, says the Pittsboro correspondent of the Indianapolis News. The bride is 27 and the bridegroom, 69.

The wedding was to have taken place some days later but Miss Ashby, who was a teacher in the Indiana Girls School, resigned her position and went to Kentucky on receiving a message from Mr. Hewett that he wished the marriage to take place at once as he had been left alone by the recent death of a daughter.

The bridegroom was a life-long friend of Miss Ashby’s grandfather and on the latter’s death last year served as administrator of the estate of which Miss Ashby was an heir.

Friday, June 17, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Lizton Man Receives Degree in Boston (1926)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, June 17, 1926 – page 8, column 4:

HENDRICKS COUNTY SON RECEIVES HIS DEGREE
Robert R. Blake, son of Mr. and Mrs. George R. Blake, of Lizton, received the degree of Bachelor of Sacred Theology from the School of Theology of Boston University, Monday. President A. Lawrence Lowell, of Harvard, delivered the commencement address and 1,000 degrees were awarded. An academic procession, marking a brilliant spectacle, preceded the commencement ceremonies. No honorary degrees were given. Pres. Daniel L. Marsh of the university presented the diplomas. The exercises came as the culmination of a week of senior events and alumni reunions.

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Monday, June 13, 2011

Surname Index to Probate Order Books Updated

Entries from the surname index included at the front of Hendricks County Probate Order Book Volume 5 (29 September 1868 - 17 June 1871) have been added to the database Surname Index to Hendricks County Probate Order Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The surname index was compiled by the clerk at the time they were writing the entries. It includes the subject of the probate case, the type of case (estate, guardianship, etc.), and the corresponding book and page number.

It is an ongoing project - currently the surname index covers the years 1868-1889.

Monday, June 6, 2011

College Students Database Updated

Entries from the 1951 and 1952 school years have been added to the database Hendricks County Students Attending Indiana Colleges, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a listing of some of the students from Hendricks County who were either attending or graduating from various colleges in Indiana, as compiled from information sent by college officials to area newspapers. The list was comprised of the student's name, hometown and class, and sometimes included their major or the degree they were receiving.

The colleges that submitted information to the newspapers varied from year to year. Ball State University, Butler University, DePauw University, Earlham College, Indiana State University, Indiana University and Purdue University are among those who submitted information at one time or another.

The database is an ongoing project. It currently covers the period of 1944-1961.

Monday, May 30, 2011

Marriage Index Updated

Entries from Hendricks County Marriage Book Volume 39 (21 October 1977 - 11 November 1978) have been added to the database Index to Hendricks County Marriage Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It includes the names of the bride and groom, their date of marriage and the corresponding book and page number.

This index is in progress - so far it covers the period of 1904-1978, as well as 1824-1848.

Sunday, May 29, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDIT: Hendricks County Students Attending Indiana Colleges (1927)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, September 15, 1927 – page 1, column 3

MORE YOUNG PEOPLE WHO GO TO COLLEGE
Additions Printed To List of College and University Entrants

Below are printed additions to the list of county young folks who are entering college this month:

From Amo: Robert Gambold and Robert Knight have entered Purdue [University]; Blanche Shortridge and Florence Beck, Indiana [University]; Blanche McDaniel and Rose Mary Draper, [Indiana] State Normal [School].

From Clayton: Mrs. Helen Reitzel Phillips, Horace Anderson, Elvin Phillips, Louise Edmonson, Cecil Edmonson, Wilbert McCormick and Cornelia Edmonson have entered Purdue; Glen Tudor, Butler; Donis McClellan, Metropolitan and Butler; Audry Martin and Maurice Thompson, Central Normal [College]; Mary Beadle, Earlham [College]; Rose Jones, Franklin [College]; Marion Joyce, Indianapolis Teachers College; Shirley Worrell, Indiana [University].

From New Winchester: Margerite Kerns entered Earlham [College]; Geneva Goodwin, Muncie Normal [School]; Luzena Newman, Central Business College; Mrs. Nema Ramsey, Central Normal College.

From Coatesville: Blythe Osborn, Myron Phillips, Mary Phillips, Dorothy Whicker, Etheline Horn will enter Central Normal [College]; Elizabeth Rogers, Earlham [College]; Worth Hodson, Paul Stayton, Purdue [University].

From Stilesville: Harlan C. Cooper goes to the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis; Maurice Brewer, Frank Brewer and Edwin Johnson come to Central Normal [College]; Gilbert Rhea continues his study of medicine at Indiana [University]; Maurice Boyd, Lorene Hicks, Mildred Whicker, Purdue [University]; Gilbert Tribbett, DePauw [University]; Beatrice Vaughn has entered the Methodist Hospital school of nursing.

Saturday, May 28, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Coatesville Man Dies In Iowa (1927)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, June 9, 1927 – page 7, column 4

FORMER HOOSIER DIES AT HIS HOME IN IOWA
Word comes to Hendricks county relatives of the death of Elias Nelson Grimes, Tuesday, May 31, at his home in Newton, Iowa. He had been in poor health for some time, and a stroke of apoplexy on the 20th hastened his passing. He was the son of Elias and Sarah Phillips Grimes, and was born on a farm near Coatesville, May 24, 1856. His younger years were spent in that community, and he will be remembered by a number of friends and relatives. He was of a kind and happy disposition, and made friends wherever he went.

Forty-six years ago, after the death of his mother, he and his father moved to Iowa and that state has been his home since that time.

He was united in marriage to Minnie Tice, at Pella, Iowa, on January 11, 1885. The widow with two daughters and one grandson are left to mourn their loss. He is also survived by one sister, Mrs. Susannah Kendall, of Indianapolis, who has been an invalid, confined to her bed for two years, and two brothers, John W. Grimes, of Long Beach, Cal., and Samuel B. Grimes, of Zionsville, Indiana.

Friday, May 27, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Brown Township School Names Explained (1927)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, March 17, 1927 – page 2, column 3

SCHOOLS OF BROWN HAVE LOCAL NAMES
Incidents That Made Them Peculiarly Their Own

When the announcement was made that “Sixty Cents” in Brown township had won the rural music memory contest, many people wanted to know how “Sixty Cents” received its name.

James W. Beck is authority on the history of Brown township where all the schools have more or less poetical names. Mr. Beck says the present school house at Sixty Cents is the third erected on that spot. It is a brick structure. The first was log and the second, frame. The frame building was erected about the close of the Civil war and when the builders pronounced it finished, a close examination showed that there was no lock for the door. A man present said he was on his way to Brownsburg and would bring back a lock. When he did so, he was asked what the lock cost and he said: “Sixty Cents.” And thus the school was named.

Mr. Beck says that other schools in Brown township have the following history. School No. 1 is called Bunkum and he thinks perhaps the proper spelling is Buncombe. The name traces back to North Carolina through the Gossett family which came from Buncombe.

School No. 2 is known as Beaver College because just across the road from it was a beaver dam. The signs of this dam are yet to be seen.

School No. 3 is Sixty Cents and No. 4 is Squankum but Mr. Beck is unable to give its history.

No. 5 is Sambo. The legend is that in an early day there was a teacher there by the name of Samuel Bough. A small boy on his way to school was stopped by a man who asked his teacher’s name and the boy replied: “Sam Bough.” And from this comes the name, “Sambo.”

No. 6 is Brown school, so named because the first coat of paint it received was brown.

No. 7 was “Greenwood” because it was located in a beautiful grove.

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Center Township School Land Sold (1929)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, March 14, 1929 – page 1, columns 4-5:

JORDAN SCHOOL PASSES AFTER MANY YEARS OF DUTY
With the publication of a notice in last week’s and this week’s edition, concerning the sale of the land comprising what is known as the “Jordan” school district, members of bygone days, back as far as 1825 have been recalled. An investigation of court records, and records of the Downard & Taylor Abstracting Co., brings forth many interesting facts and names of leading men of the community at that time.

In the notice the same description of the land is used that is found in the original deeding of the land to the trustees of Center township, which deed was recorded on April 5, 1856. It showed that John D. Burks and his wife, Mary, conveyed the one acre of land contained in the tract now offered for sale, to the trustees of Center township, who were at that time, Enion Singer, Abraham Estes and Abraham Bland. Another name appearing on the record which is familiar to every one in Hendricks county, is that of P.S. Kennedy, justice of the peace at that time.

The land as recorded in the original deed, is in Deed Record No. 19, Page 451, and the description of the land in the notice read as follows:

“A part of the west half of the south-east quarter of section 1, township 15 north, range 1 west, bounded and described as follows, to-wit: Beginning at a point in the plank road where the lands of William Blanton, John D. Burks, Dan D. Hambleton and Moses Guynn corners, then running south on the line of said Hambleton’s lands, 20 rods; thence east on a line parallel with the plank road, 8 rods; thence north on a line parallel with Hambleton’s east line, 20 roads to the road; thence west along the center of said plank road, 8 roads to the place of beginning, estimated to contain one acre, more or less.”

Mention of the old plank road will bring to the minds of some few citizens of the county, the first road between Indianapolis and Danville, which was called the plank road because of its construction, made necessary by the bottomless condition of the roads during the spring and fall. More recent developments in the case of the old plank road, occurred when some of the old planks were dug up by workmen, repairing the gravel road which had replaced the plank road as the country became more populated. The present concrete road, of course, was a modern development of the last few years.

An inquiry into the first deed record, found the land originally belonging to one Basil Tout, who entered the west half of the southeast quarter in his name. This was recorded on May 10, 1831.

Basil Tout conveyed 80 acres to Geo. Burks on Aug. 30, 1834, while Geo. Burks, presumably the father of John D. Burks, conveyed the land to the latter named Burks on March 28, 1851. The tract of one acre of the 80 contained in the deed to John D. Burks was granted to Center township for school purposes on April 5, 1856. The land has remained in the hands of the trustees of Center township to the present time, when it will be sold to the highest bidder by Walter P. Hendrix, trustee, on March 28, just 78 years from the day it was conveyed to John Burks, the grantor of the land to the township. And thus passes, because of the trend of events, another rural school. Some well known men and women have taught at Jordan. Miss Jennie Craven, later Mrs. Samuel M. Ralston, taught one winter there in the brick building which burned a few years ago. She walked from Danville to the school and back each day. School wagons had not then been “invented.”

Monday, May 23, 2011

Teachers Database Updated

Entries from the 1945 school year have been added to the database Index to Teachers in Hendricks County Schools, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. It is a list of all of the teachers in the county's schools, as published in area newspapers at the beginning of each school year by the county's schools superintendent. The list was comprised of the teacher's name and their location, and sometimes included the subjects they were teaching.

The database is in progress - it currently covers 1945-1963.

Sunday, May 22, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: North Salem Man Named Professor At Indiana University

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, May 23, 1929 – page 1, column 2:

PROF. D.S. ROBINSON COMES TO INDIANA U.
Son of County To Return To His Native State

Professor Daniel Sommer Robinson, a son of Hendricks county, has been selected head of the department of philosophy at Indiana university, his work to begin next September.

Professor Robinson was born at North Salem, October 19, 1888, and is a son of Mr. and Mrs. William Robinson. He graduated from the North Salem high school in 1906, and received the degree, Bachelor of Arts, from Butler college in 1910. He was a student in the Yale Divinity school, 1910-13, where he received the degree Master of Arts in 1911, and Bachelor of Divinity in 1912. He was a student in Germany for a time in 1912-13. He was a student in Harvard university, 1914-1917 and received the degree, Doctor of Philosophy, from there in 1917. He married Miss Oma Glasburn, of Bargersville, in 1912. To this union were born three children, Daniel Sommer, deceased, Joan and Sydney Caroline.

Prof. Robinson was ordained in the Disciples ministry in 1910, was pastor of the Christian church in Billings, Montana, in 1913-14; South Congregational Church, Newport, N.H., 1917-18. He was instructor in philosophy, University of Wisconsin, 1919-20; assistant professor, 1920-21. He has been professor of philosophy in Miami university since 1922.

Miss Clarice Robinson, a sister of Professor Robinson, graduated from Indiana University in 1926, and is head of the commercial department in the Elkhart schools.

Saturday, May 21, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Danville Man Married in Mishawaka (1929)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, April 11, 1929 – page 1, column 2:

JOHN SPEARS MARRIES
This is the story that should have been written by John Spears, of the local staff of the paper, but as he is honey-mooning, the duty falls elsewhere in the office. Mr. Spears and Miss Helen Moore were married, Tuesday, at the home of Miss Moore in Mishawaka. Their license was issued in Indianapolis. Monday, Mr. Spears disappeared from this office without explanation. A telegram, yesterday, told the story. Their romance began at that Indiana headquarters for romances – DePauw university, and the wedding is the happy culmination. Friends of Mr. Spears are awaiting his arrival in Danville.

Friday, May 20, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Bride For 1 Day Is Granted Divorce (1929)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, November 7, 1929 – page 1, column 3:

BRIDE OF ONE DAY DIVORCED IN PUTNAM [COUNTY]
Frances E. Rushton, of Hendricks county, a bride of one day, was given a divorce from William Burton Rushton, convict, by Judge James P. Hughes, in the Putnam Circuit court, Saturday. The maiden name of Pettitt also was restored to the young woman.

The young bride plaintiff in the action, said she was married to the defendant in the Hendricks county jail, last February 26, and that on the following day he was sentenced to 1 to 10 years in the Indiana State Reformatory, when he pleaded guilty to vehicle taking. She has seen her husband but once since that time, she told the court.

After hearing the bride say she could not love or live with her convict husband after his release from the reformatory, Judge Hughes granted the divorce.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Middle Township Man Was Never Declared Dead (1930)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, November 27, 1930 – page 1, column 6

A CORRECTION
In the issue of Nov. 13, these columns carried a story that Weasley Beaman voted in the recent election after he had been declared dead for the purpose of setting his father’s estate. The statement was an error although it reached this office in an apparently authentic form. Mr. Beaman called at the office, Monday, and stated that he was not declared dead legally or otherwise; that he has never been away from home for a period longer than one week and that was while on a visit. His vote never tied the score in the trustee’s election in Middle township. He did not vote the straight Democratic ticket but he did not vote for any Republican in the November election, 1930. He says the whole story is a fabrication as no Beaman of his family was ever declared dead that he ever heard of.

Monday, May 16, 2011

Surname Index To Probate Order Books Updated

Entries from the surname index included at the front of Hendricks County Probate Order Book Volume 14 (25 June 1888 - 30 November 1889) have been added to the database Surname Index to Hendricks County Probate Order Books, which is on the Hendricks County GenWeb site. The surname index was compiled by the clerk at the time they were writing the entries. It includes the subject of the probate case, the type of case (estate, guardianship, etc.), and the corresponding book and page number.

It is an ongoing project - currently the surname index covers the years 1871-1889.

Sunday, May 15, 2011

OBITUARY: Dr. Benjamin McCarty Logan (1874)

from the Cumberland [County, Illinois] Democrat, Majority Point - issue of Friday, June 12, 1874 - page 3, column 2)

Logan, Dr. B. M. died on June 11, 1874 at Brownsburg, Indiana, aged 66 years and 5 days. The deceased was the father of L.L. and William Logan of this place and was born in Brookville, Indiana in the year 1808. At the age of 22 years Mr. Logan commenced the study of medicine, which practice he followed for 38 years. In 1833 Mr. Logan removed with his family to Brownsburg, Indiana, where in connection with his profession he sold goods for many years. Dr. Logan was an excellent man, and although he never connected himself with any one church organization, he was a man of exemplary habits and the strictest morals, and no man ever died more sincerely regretted, or had more warm and devoted friends, than himself. His funeral was very largely attended by sympathizing friends and relatives whom came to pay their last testimonial to the worth of him who pased from this life to the reward of an honest and worthy man.

[Obituary submitted by Suzanne Miller]

Saturday, May 14, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Schoolhouse in Washington Township Sold (1930)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, December 11, 1930 – page 5, column 5

CRAFTON SCHOOL HOUSE NUMBERED WITH THOSE GONE
Crafton school house in Washington township was sold at auction, Saturday. The following has been received from one of the community:

Gone But Not Forgotten
The White Lick Community club bids farewell to the old Crafton school house, district No. 4 in Washington township.

After being abandoned for three or four years the community conceived the idea of using it as a community meeting place.

The trustee being approached, gladly giving his consent, as he thought it a worthy move. The building being in bad condition we repaired it by putting in many window panes, fixing doors, putting on locks and other things needed. We then furnished it with chairs, tables, piano, stoves, curtains, dishes, cooking utensils, lights, song books, cleaned up the yard and kept it mowed, making it comfortable at a cost of several hundred dollars.

For seven years this club has met every months, besides many social entertainments, church programs and banquets given by other groups, always open to any worthwhile activity.

Our present trustee did not look on this club with favor. He sold the building and grounds in the face of a petition presented by the club, signed by 58 voters out of a possible 72 in the district, to hold the school house as a community center.

We feel our loss very keenly. The club is storing the furniture until they can find a suitable location.

Dear old Crofton, we tried so hard to save you. For seven years your friends have met with you and you have protected them and now we will look back on you with love and respect and recall the many happy times we have spent with you – Goodbye.

CRAFTON SCHOOL
After the Court had denied an injunction designed to prevent the sale of the Crafton school by the trustee, the building was sold at auction to John Robinson for $280. Then to make it a full day for him, Mr. Robinson gave the Avon high school athletic association his check for $500.

Friday, May 13, 2011

NEWSPAPER TIDBIT: Hendricks County Couple Divorced in Morgan County (1930)

from The Republican (Danville, Indiana) – issue of Thursday, October 9, 1930 – page 5, column 4

DIVORCE AND $6000 ALIMONY
(Martinsville Reporter)
The divorce case of Hattie Stevenson vs. Oscar Stevenson, venued here from Hendricks county, was tried on Wednesday in the Morgan circuit court. After the hearing of the evidence was concluded the plaintiff was granted a divorce, alimony in the sum of $6,000 and $500 for attorney fees. The plaintiff and defendant were divorce in 1917, but a few months later they remarried. The plaintiff charged the defendant with cruel treatment, alleged that he associated with other women, that he sold liquor to girls and boys, that he was convicted in Federal court of violation of the prohibition laws, was sentenced to sixty days in the Marion county jail, and was fined $300. The defendant filed a cross-complaint, alleging that the plaintiff was of a jealous nature, frequently left home, that she falsely accused him of intimacy with other women, falsely charged him with possession and sale of intoxicating liquor and conspired with other persons to the end that he was arrested and imprisoned on a charge of violating the prohibition laws and while he was in prison the plaintiff filed suit for divorce. A number of Hendricks county citizens were here as witnesses in the case and the hearing lasted most of the day.